Pricing Your Work


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    Art by Tanner Garlick

    Hello friends! Our most recent episode just dropped, click here to listen or to read the shownotes. Feel free to discuss any thoughts or questions related to this episode in this thread. Thanks for listening!

    "How much should I charge?" This is a common question that every professional artist needs to confront and understand, yet it is often talked about so vaguely which leads to a lot of confusion and mystery. In this episode we hope to shed some much needed light on the subject. We go over day rates, how much beginning children's book illustrators typically make, things to consider when pricing your work, negotiation tips, whether or not you should do work for exposure, and the benefits to having an agent.



  • I find it best to break Pricing discussions into two main categories:

    1. Flat Fee. In which the illustrator creates the work and gets paid a one-time fee.

    2. Royalties. Ongoing Revenue. This usually involves an advance of some kind with (potential) ongoing payments as the image continues to be licensed over time.

    The approach you use to price each will involve some or all of the factors mentioned in the podcast.
    I always prefer a royalty arrangement because there is never the "fear of leaving money on the table".

    But that said, pricing work (either flat fee or royalty) should primarily be determined by the value of the image to the client.



  • Great episode! I am just curious how all of this would be different when you are living in EU. The principles are the same I guess 😃 But for example prices would be totally different imo. I would love to be proven wrong 😃



  • More thoughts on pricing:

    You really can't have a discussion like this without mentioning the Graphic Artist Guilds Pricing and Ethical Guidelines.
    https://graphicartistsguild.org/15th-edition-of-the-graphic-artists-guild-handbook-pricing-ethical-guidelines-published/
    To purchase:
    https://www.amazon.com/Graphic-Artists-Guild-Handbook-Guidelines/dp/1507206682/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=8RBBE2HVE05W25G8HP5P

    In Great Britain I am aware of the Association of Illustrators
    https://theaoi.com/resources/pricing/pricing-basics/
    Please post links to other illustrator organizations that address pricing issues for their members.

    BUT one of the best articles I've ever read on how to think about pricing is from Jessica Hische:
    http://www.jessicahische.is/thinkingthoughtsaboutpricing



  • I really like this episode! Pricing is always an issue for me.
    Recently I also listened to this Youtube and I think it really helps:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTi3nJAvzRs&t=11s

    I also think Michael Janda's Youtube channel covers a lot of similar issues:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMtMijHO1MVzw_Mjkh7_amw



  • Class episode, great insights.

    Here is a spreadsheet on google docs of anonymous wages for art jobs Arts + All Museums Salary Transparency 2019_View Only

    Can't find any illustrator prices, there's a few designer positions listed. Just interesting to see the variety of art jobs out there and what people are getting.


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    Great episode! And thanks @davidhohn and everyone else for the additional info! The struggle I’m having recently is explaining limited use licensing. My friends husband is starting a business hoping it will be something that ends up like salt life or tapout. It’s for a pretty specific market. However he’s not an artist. Which seems weird to me why he would want to start up something like this. But he’s hiring mutual friend for the images and I may try some for women’s. I would rather do a flat fee and a time frame that he can use the image. Then we can reevaluate after that. I don’t want to sign it completely over. Does that protect both of us? He doesn’t have to pay for a lifetime usage for something he might not need for a lifetime. But when I tried to explain it to him and also another client it goes over their head. The shop owner said that “You listen to too many podcasts.” Yay. He’s still a great guy and I’ll let it go.



  • @Whitney-Simms said in Pricing Your Work:

    Great episode! And thanks @davidhohn and everyone else for the additional info! The struggle I’m having recently is explaining limited use licensing. My friends husband is starting a business hoping it will be something that ends up like salt life or tapout. It’s for a pretty specific market. However he’s not an artist. Which seems weird to me why he would want to start up something like this. But he’s hiring mutual friend for the images and I may try some for women’s. I would rather do a flat fee and a time frame that he can use the image.

    Just to clarify a bit more, the flat fee for a limited time frame I would consider a "royalty" **. That is, you are licensing your work for a limited amount of time with the idea that if the product sells you will then relicense it for an additional fee (effectively a passive revenue stream as you don't have to sit down and create a new piece every time you receive a licensing payment) This is basically what happens with other "advance against royalty" arrangements like picture books, or t-shirt designs.

    When I mentioned "Flat Fee" earlier I was referring to those arrangements in which copyright is either legally (Work For Hire) or effectively (All Rights) transferred to the client. Leaving little or no possibility for the illustrator to generate passive revenue

    Then we can reevaluate after that. I don’t want to sign it completely over.

    I generally recommend conducting your freelance business in this way.

    Does that protect both of us? He doesn’t have to pay for a lifetime usage for something he might not need for a lifetime.

    As a general practice, yes that should protect both of you. Be very specific about what rights are being licensed. This guy might think he's "buying" the artwork (i.e. Work For Hire in which he is now the legal "owner" of the copyright) As you can imagine that is (and should be) VERY expensive. Charging upfront for every potential use of an image for 95 years from creation involves accounting for many potential uses.

    But when I tried to explain it to him and also another client it goes over their head. The shop owner said that “You listen to too many podcasts.” Yay. He’s still a great guy and I’ll let it go.

    It's your job to understand how to license your work, since as a professional illustrator that's how we generate income from our creative efforts. And as you've already experienced, being able to educate potential clients is part of the job as well. If needed explain it like renting a car. If there's only a little money in the budget they get to rent the car for the day. If there's LOTS of money in the budget they get to "buy" the car for life. That should simplify it down to a level that someone brand new to licensing can understand.

    ** In light of this clarification I edited my initial post about royalties to be more accurate to the kind of license I meant. I always enjoy discussions like these as they encourage me to clarify my own thinking.



  • Great episode, I'm glad someone is OK with talking about this globally taboo subject.

    I had a situation a little while ago when I was contacted by an agent looking for an artworker on behalf a client. They saw some drawings of animals I created for an online portfolio/gallery and praised my ability, saying that I was perfect for what they were looking for. The client was a butchers business looking for images of animals, in a style matching their branding, to be reproduced in large format to apply to their delivery vans. I was very excited to have been picked out and contacted, the job was right up my street and I very much wanted to do it.

    I offered a flat rate for the whole job, including region and period usage, with consideration for myself being an inexperienced artist. I figured having my artwork so publicly accessible was a bonus too. I was thrilled at the prospect of this opportunity.

    I proposed £500 ($663 at that time) open to negotiation and the contact kept me waiting for 3 weeks (ignoring my follow up communications). They finally responded saying they accepted an offer from another artist due to budget constraints. I undervalued myself and my cheap offer was rejected for an even cheaper one. So hard to swallow!!

    I later realised that it's important to keep going and keep trying, regardless of the missed opportunities and step backs.

    Thanks for reading.



  • @tqcreative Thank you for sharing this. I have wondered about this too. I'm still early in my career, though, so maybe you or other professionals could weigh in?

    My concern is:

    • Sometimes I'm afraid to quote according to what I think my services would be worth and how long it would take for me to finish the project, because I think it wouldn't take long for the client to go with someone with lower rates. My rates have been outside of clients' budgets before, and oftentimes they wouldn't budge at all. Either I lower my rate and close the deal, or they leave and find someone else. Is there a way to avoid this?

    E.g. For a recent project, I was told the budget was $1500 for 20 detailed paintings. I quoted $2500 for the 20 paintings, but because the client couldn't afford that, they counter-proposed $1800, and I accepted. I knew it should have been more, but didn't know how else to handle it. I know Will mentioned this as being a potential problem faced by illustrators starting out in this particular episode. I wonder how we could deal with this without selling ourselves short.


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