Texture and moonlight...trying new things and needing help



  • I’ve been trying to work with much more texture and build my portfolio. I have a serious lack of night scenes and no real lighting focused pieces. So I am attempting to fix that. My problem is that I am not sure I am doing it successfully.

    “The Owl and The Pussycat”poem by Edward Lear is my inspiration. In this part of the poem the owl and the cat sail away together in a pea green boat and the owl sings/ plays guitar to the cat by the light of the moon and stars. Those are the essential pieces that I needed to include. ( I chose to include a cuddle rather than singing- but I did include the guitar)

    I had a real problem with light and reflections from the moon. I decided to play back the stars a bit and make them more primitive. How does the light look? Are there glaring problems I am missing?
    Also does the piece work as a unit? Do the drawing style and rendering style and textures work together? I tried to follow some of the pointers from Lee White’s YouTube video as I missed the live demo last week.

    Any help is much desired and appreciated. 😁

    E5792E94-722A-403C-BB54-A1DB1200EDE8.jpeg



  • @JennyJones

    Hi, perhaps a bit more definition with the boats shadow, because you have some of the stars reflected but not the mass or the critters/guitar. I know you didn't ask about this but the water looks like it just ends really quickly and the guitar looks isolated (lacking connection on its own, without the words).

    I have yet to do any night scenes so I am going to leave that to others. 🙂



  • @JennyJones I think it looks great overall. I think you could deepen and define your shadows of everything though. I really am loving the texture.



  • @chrisaakins Thanks. I think I will deepen the shadows and fix the shadow of the boat too. Thanks for the comments guys



  • I really like the use of texture- I think the sky/moon & lighting on the boat and sail work well. I would only suggest brightening (adding/changing something) to emphasize the faces of the animals to drive home the focal point. Really beautiful piece!


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