water color or copic marker



  • The only way to choose a medium is to work in that medium. I love the look and process of oils but it doesn't work for what I want to do. It's too slow, the turpentine sets off my Asthma, it's too expensive for the way I use paint. Lots of reasons. But I had to go through that process to rule it out as an option. Plenty of people pick up watercolours for the first time and vow never to use them again! I was the same with acrylics. Well, I tried them twice, and both times I threw my paper 😉 What sort of look do you want to achieve in your work? Markers lend themselves really well to graphic styles of art. Watercolours have that quintessentially traditional feel that we've come to expect from children's illustration, but even then, it depends on how they are used. Non-granulating pigments on hot pressed paper can look very graphic when light and shadow is applied, well, graphically! I feel like you're trying to skip the most exciting step in your art journey! This is the fun bit, when you're not really sure of anything, and you're just playing around. I have a set of spectrum Noir pens, and they're really good. Not my "thing" in art, but fun to experiment with. Go have some fun!



  • I agree with @Rapteev that you really have to try! There is no perfect medium, the important thing is to try them all (or at least a few) and find out which one you like and dislike or which one works/doesn't work with your style!

    I started painting in oil (when I was in high school), then acrylics, then watercolor, and eventually I fell in love with soft pastels and use almost exclusively this medium (and digital) but I would never have thought I would like it before actually trying it!



  • thank you guys yeah i should try them out. do u guys recommend me any tutorials for both of them ?



  • @linhb There are a lot of good choices out there for beginners if you know where to look. I say go for this one. It comes with 72 different colors of good cheap markers, giving you the color options that you need for your artwork. I think the selection of color is good and better than what more expensive brands can offer you, so if you are starting and you are looking for more colors to add to your repertoire, this should be a good choice.



  • @linhb I would recommend Winsor & Newton brushmarkers and Ohuhu brushmarkers for affordable beginning alcohol marker choices. And totally agree with Rapteev above!



  • Someone told me watercolors were the hardest to work with so i went with the watercolors. However, I do not think it is that simple because mediums varies based off of each artist and their ability to understand them.

    I'm currently on both watercolors, ink, and alcohol based markers process or in other words mixed medium.

    Hope this helps. Try it out. The water colors are cheaper and will go further. Plus i use rubbing alcohol and markers with with just the rubbing alcohol, dip it in watercolor and bend it to my will. haha


  • SVS OG

    Get a pack of prang watercolors and a pack of copics and see what you like best. Shouldn’t be too expensive. Like 4 copics.



  • I realize that the original question was asked three years ago, but this topic caught my eye, so I thought I'd respond, too. My advice is actually a bit different re: cheap watercolors and paper. There is a BIG difference between professional watercolor supplies and student grade paints and paper. I recommend at least mid-grade level paper and professional paints for trying it out. You can do small tubes (the paint really does last forever) in a set of primaries from companies like Daniel Smith, Winsor and Newton, Sennelier, or other professional grade paints. If you are in the US, I highly recommend Fluid brand paper as a reasonably-priced mid-level paper that will let you more fully experience what the paints can do. But if you can afford a small block of 100% cotton paper, that's the way to go. When you're learning, make it easier on yourself to actually get good results. I only use student grade paper for testing color mixes and brush techniques. For any final painting, I use professional grade paper and feel SO MUCH happier with my results than when I try to use student grade paper. Professional grade paper is much more forgiving and can handle a lot more paint and layers. I highly recommend Carrie Luc as a resource for beginning watercolor artists: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO1i2JmrYr2rgLa8vYRrnFg

    With copics, do a search on YouTube for blending advice, get a 3-5 color blending set (maybe start with grey tones) and get some cheap cardstock from an office supply store. Paper that is too absorbant will suck the ink right out of your pen and make blending more difficult. But you want the paper to be thick enough to take a lot of ink. I don't use copics nearly as much as watercolor, so I can't remember particular instructors for them.


  • SVS OG

    Guys, this thread was posted 3 years ago.





  • One thing that I hate the most when doing coloring is when ink settles on the surface of the paper and refuses to dry up quickly. I occasionally smear this wet puddle of ink and get it not just on myself but on my precious artwork! Enter the best alcohol-based markers.
    These markers are a godsend because they dry up quickly. I turn to them whenever I need to color real quick and don’t want the tedious waiting time. I can turn up new art faster.



  • I am totally agree with Rapteev above! Still, I would recommend Arteza Watercolor Brush Pen markers and Ohuhu Brush markers as you are starting as a beginner.



  • The best Copic markers to purchase first are those that will work well with your projects. Because Copic markers come in a variety of sizes, you may select the ones with the largest tip for easier coverage based on the size of your project.
    For starters, the Copic Classic will not let you down when it comes to learning how to use these markers. These markers may be customized in a variety of ways. They're also really helpful.


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