Query Email to Illustration Rep /Agent Feedback



  • So I'm tentatively embarking on reaching out to agents/reps/whatever you want to call them, and I've just sent my first e-mail. Am not expecting to be picked up, since I'm told you get many nos before you get a yes, but it occurred to me that maybe I should've gotten some feedback first before doing this, haha.

    So here's my general format:

    Hello! My name is Kasey Snow and I am an illustrator who currently works with private clients to create children's books, fantasy illustrations, and book covers. I came across your profile on the _________ Agency site and I really clicked with the type of interests you have in the book world.

    To give you a little background information on myself, I worked as a public school art teacher for five years before transitioning to freelance illustration. For the past few years I have been working from the ground up gathering clients and a fanbase around my work. I am at the stage where I feel ready to take the next step in my career and was wondering if you felt that I would fit in with the illustrators you currently represent.

    I have attached a few sample images of my work. If you are interested in seeing more, my website is https://www.kaseysnow.com/ . If you would like to reach me by phone, my cell is ____________________.

    Either way, thank you so much for your time. I hope that you have a great day. 🙂

    ~Kasey Snow

    Any thoughts? You will not hurt my feelings, I want to succeed, so be honest, haha.



  • @Kasey-Snow Hi Kasey, I have never written a letter trying to engage an agent, so this may be way off base. In other careers I have had, I’ve been told it’s helpful to state specifics about value you can offer to the place where you are trying to get a job.

    So, for each agency/rep, your value might vary. For example, if you think a style could fill a gap you know they have, tell them why your work can do that. Or if you see that the artists they represent use bold colors, digital art, whatever, point out how your work does something similar but with an added oomph of something unique you offer.

    Basically, let them know why taking you on can be to their advantage so it’s a mutually beneficial relationship.

    Best!


  • SVS OG

    @Kasey-Snow
    Hi, Kasey. From what I’ve learned, brevity is the key to these type of things. So instead of saying:

    I came across your profile on the _________ Agency site and I really clicked with the type of interests you have in the book world.

    You could say:

    “I found you on _________ Agency and I believe we’re a great fit.”

    .
    .

    Also, avoid uneccessary and wordy phrases like:

    To give you a little background information on myself, I worked as a public school art teacher for five years before transitioning to freelance illustration. For the past few years...

    You could go directly with:

    “I worked as a public school art teacher for five years before transitioning to ...”
    .
    .

    Avoid redundancies. You’ve already stated how your’s and the agent’s taste clicked. So instead of saying:

    I am at the stage where I feel ready to take the next step in my career and was wondering if you felt that I would fit in with the illustrators you currently represent.

    Just say:
    “ I am at the stage where I feel to take the next step in my career.”
    .
    .
    As mentioned in the last Third Thursday episode about agents, agents want to know more about the illustrators but with the volume of applications they recieve, it’s quite off putting to read a lengthy letter. It helps to keep it short and concise. I hope this has been helpful.



  • @Nyrryl-Cadiz Definitely helpful, thank you! I always tend toward overly wordy, I appreciate the feedback!

    @BichonBistro Thank you! That's a really practical way to look at approaching this. Much appreciated!


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