Seeking portfolio/work critique



  • I’ve been a member of SVS since the beginning of 2018 and have been working through courses and really enjoying it. Lots of great information and insights. Other than entering the June “mushroom village” contest, this is my first post. I’ll admit – I’m not that good at reaching out and soliciting (or offering) feedback or just collaborating in general. But, I know that it is a great way to grow so I’m always trying to do more of this. SVS certainly seems like a good place to do this.

    Having said that, I’m looking for some critiques and feedback on my work and portfolio.

    Some of the pieces in my portfolio are actual client work, some are specific projects that I created, and others are work that really just show my style (and subject matter to a certain extent). In addition to general comments on my work, I’m also interested in hearing where you may see my work fitting. What types of things/applications could it be used on? I feel my thinking can be limited in this area, so I’m certainly open to what other think.

    My portfolio is on my website, and the portfolio pieces plus all of my other work are on my social media channels.

    Website: http://www.drawnbyshawn.com
    Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/drawnbyshawn
    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drawnbyshawn

    Thanks!



  • @drawnbyshawn Your website looks incredibly clean and polished. No visual distractions and very orderly arranged. That being said, wired does make me tired along with headaches. Interesting to note you made a digital mock up of how being digitally wired can be exhausting. 🙂 I like how you work in the sketches on the same page as the final work, placing them after the rendered one. I have seen others put it on a separate Sketchbook page, but I have no issue on how you have done it. My favourite works of yours are your Monsters and your Yellow Submarine painting piece.

    🙂 Also like Robot punch on your Instagram.



  • @heather-boyd Thanks for the feedback.

    Yeah, I supposed it can be kind of ironic to have a digital mockup for an article about how constant access to tech can be bad for you. It's a double-edge sword though. I do most of my reading digitally, but it's hard to not get drawn over to social media and other things since it's all on the same device.



  • I can see your work fitting in a number of places, most of them already represented on your website. Editorial, character design, comics. I could see you fitting into children's books and middle grade books as well, with your overall style, but I feel you'd have to make some changes to the way you stylize children's faces. As of now your work feels like it targets more of an adult market with the way you stylize your children's faces. The proportions, angularity, and line descriptions of their features makes them look mature and masculine. It feels more catered to adult viewers than to children or parents choosing material for their children.

    Just my opinion. I think that overall your work feels very professional and that you have a solid style.



  • @tessaw Thanks for the feedback.

    I do agree with your comments on the children's faces. One thing I'm drawn to is the "character" in older faces and exaggerating that in drawing. I've been trying to extend that style to younger people and kids, but it hasn't been feeling totally right. I think you're hitting on some of the specific reasons. I'm actually working on a piece right now that I've been using as a way to experiment with this more, and I think I'm getting closer. I'll keep your comments in mind as I continue to work at it.

    Thanks again!



  • You're welcome! I see where you are coming from. I tend to think that while you can really play with the design of a character of any age, it seems like there are way less options when it comes to the smaller details of babies and little kids if you want to keep them cute and looking young. It then becomes more about superficial variations like hair, and clothing. As the characters start getting older and entering the preteen stage and beyond, you can really start playing with a whole lot more and still feel true to the age of the character.

    Good luck on the piece your working on! Hope you can find something you feel satisfied with.



  • @tessaw Yeah. I'm much more of a "line" person, and linework usually translates to "age" on faces. So, less is usually better if you want it to look younger.