Do I have enough content to approach an agency?



  • Hello, I'm still working on some sequential work and other stand-alone illustrations to fill my website. I would really like to approach an agency soon, but Idk if my website is ready. I'm ready, but I'm not sure about the website.

    My website like is here: www.michaelangelogo.com.



  • The artwork is lovely! A suggestion for your website: I wouldn’t include work experience from high school. You’ve gone through college, gotten a degree and are looking to get contacts with an agency, as well as become a professional illustrator. It seems odd to include a mention of winning a red ribbon week poster contest during your sophomore year in high school. I also would remove the phrase “despite his shortcomings”. As I tell my high school students they are preparing their portfolios, it is never good to actively point out shortcomings and such. Your prospective clients and agencies might question why you’re including that. But perhaps others can weigh in on these things?



  • I can’t speak towards the amount of work but thought I’d offer this edit!
    Orig;
    noticed that many children's show did not feature many Filipino characters in animation, and wanted to pursue a career in that field. However, in 2020, Michael Angelo graduated from Cal Poly Pomona with a Bachelor's Degree in Architecture.

    Edit:
    After graduating from Cal Poly Pomona with a Bachelors degree in Architecture, Michael turned his designer’s eye back towards his lifelong pursuit: illustration.

    He enjoys illustrating people of different shapes and sizes, experimenting with different types of color palettes, and finding new ways to introduce the world to Filipino culture.

    Michael- maybe add something in here about the type of working relationship people can expect from you.

    And, Agreed, no need to mention any shortcomings. If there is something that will influence your ability to work for a client/agency, you can talk to them about it in person and try to create a solution.


  • Pro

    @Michael-Angelo-Go I can't believe what a massive improvement it is from where it was just a couple months ago. Amazing work! 10-12 pieces is enough to start approaching publishers and agents. Apart from that, I agree with everything @lpetiti and @KayPotter suggested 🙂 also would add maybe include the names of the clients in the testimonials (looks less legit otherwise) and in your contact form "full real name" sounds like a very odd phrasing. You can just write "name" there and people will figure it fine.



  • @NessIllustration Basically what I did was I removed all the character art and only put in work that shows a fully illustrated scene. I still plan on adding more though. My plan was to have at least 24-36 illustrations before approaching, but maybe now's the time to start looking. I'll take all of your advice about the description though too.


  • Pro

    @Michael-Angelo-Go Many people consider 24-36 is really too much. 15 seems to be an optimal number, but anything above 10 is good.



  • @NessIllustration Okay just fixed what everyone said.



  • Better, looking great! I would get rid of the note at the bottom that says "YOUR agency could be here!". Personally it just doesn't sound right.



  • @lpetiti Eh... does it make me sound like a salesman?

    @NessIllustration I just emailed Astound Us again since they were the first agency that actually responded to my emails. I'm using my professional email. I know special emails aren't necessary, but it's just for the occassion.



  • @Michael-Angelo-Go It really does.



  • @NessIllustration I literally messaged Astound Us today and 20 minutes later they sent me a response telling me to keep up my portfolio. I guess that email is just an automated message.


  • Pro

    @Michael-Angelo-Go Keep it up like.. keep it online because we'll check it out at some point soon?


Log in to reply