Character Practice



  • Some character design and rendering practice. 0_1479977115813_character-design-1.jpg



  • @evilrobot looks geat! The hair is designed so well, and really gives him that over the top look. He remind me of my old boss who owned a cardboard box wherehouse. He was really in love with cardboard, and I knew evertime I saw him he would want to tell me about some fact about cardboard I wasn't considering in my daily life.

    So I think that is a good thing, becaue the character design envokes certain emotions from me.



  • More character practice 0_1480060120309_character-practice.jpg



  • And a colored version0_1480094511299_character-design-color.jpg



  • Some more character design practice. Turning a character is insanely hard.....Did the front view first and just can't seem to get that side view to work. 0_1480195346246_Billy-design-sheet.jpg



  • @evilrobot All the characters look pretty amazing to me! I have the same problems with drawing faces/full body in perspective, but what I've found extremely helpful (beside reference pictures) is to search for a 3D model close to what I need and then rotate it to understand better the perspective I am going for. This is one on the websites I think is great for that https://sketchfab.com/ . Hope this helps!



  • @evilrobot Turning characters correctly requires lots of practice. We are still lucky that as a preparation for illustration work they do not need to be so exact. In preproduction for animation character turns have to be extremely precise and I remember losing points for things like the position of the feet not aligning properly....
    Be careful with your child characters -there seem to be too many lines on the face. They affect age and character appeal negatively. In children and young women it is generally advised to only hint at the features and to be very minimalistic with lines on the face.