Critique my style (periodic checkin)



  • Mannnn, it's just all freaking great!

    The only thing I'd ask you about is one thing about the character designs. You draw all the details inside the shape of the character, without anything really poking out of the lines making up the main forms. I personally like breaking those lines. Any reason you don't?



  • @kylebeaudette For some reason I love silhouette and clean shapes. I used to try and really get some deets breaking the lines but everything would come out muddy πŸ™‚



  • @Braden-Hallett it works, I'm just looking for things to sayπŸ˜…

    Can't wait to have a Braden Hallett graphic novel in my classroom πŸ™ŒπŸ™Œ



  • @kylebeaudette said in Critique my style (periodic checkin):

    Can't wait to have a Braden Hallett graphic novel in my classroom

    😊


  • SVS OG

    Here's my terribly un-informed response. Having grown up on comic books, poured over Asterix books as a teen, and having read a few of the more current graphic novels, I think that there is more stylistic expectations in comics than in graphic novels. In other words, I think the "appropriate style" for a graphic novel is whatever style the author brings to it.

    The fact is that, in my opinion, "Braden Hallett's style" -- whether you decide to fade lines or not fade lines, break the outline or not break the outline etc. -- is already delightful to look at and the tweaks you are experimenting with are at this point really more for your own artistic sensibility than for your readers because as far as I'm concerned, anything you do is great. Like others have said, I'm just waiting for you to publish something so I can have your work on my shelf.



  • @Braden-Hallett said in Critique my style (periodic checkin):

    1.) Does the method of fading the lines to nothing as the image recedes work? I think it's works fine for picture books, but for graphic novels is this approach a good idea?

    I love this idea. I think it really creates depth to the image. I generally thought graphic novels usually rely heavily on linework, because it is generally faster to do. But there are some european graphic novels which are very painterly. I will send over to you next time I saw something like that pops up on my IG feeds.

    I also recall studio Ghibli's movies use line work only on characters, and the environment is very painterly. It is really beautiful, and the create a very present feeling with the envionment.

    2.) Is there too little detail? Any ideas on artists I could look at to draw inspiration from to add some more? (assume I'll be using this for picture books as well)

    I think the images for snowy scene do not feel lack of details at all. I can feel the texture of the character's cloth, the materials of objects. The autum scene do feel lack of a tad bit of details. I think it has more to do with the variation of texture, rather than details. I think you can make the image rich by finding ways to show that objects and things are made with different materials, and they feel different. Right now, the organge trees and cloud feels made of the same materials. I hope this make some scene.



  • @demotlj said in Critique my style (periodic checkin):

    Here's my terribly un-informed response.

    no such thing πŸ™‚

    Thanks for the kind words! I do think it still has a ways to go, though πŸ™‚



  • @xin-li said in Critique my style (periodic checkin):

    I will send over to you next time I saw something like that pops up on my IG feeds.

    I see them from time to time too. I'll be interested to see what you gather! Thanks πŸ™‚

    @xin-li said in Critique my style (periodic checkin):

    Right now, the organge trees and cloud feels made of the same materials.

    Interesting! They very much do look like they're made of the same stuff. I'll have to keep working on how to convey texture with my brush sets.

    Thanks for the feedback πŸ˜ƒ



  • @Braden-Hallett yeah i think your style is fantastic. Like you’ve got it down it seems. I think you can benefit from thinking about the medium of comics more as you’re creating your layouts. How you can use the various elements of comics (panels, word balloons, sound fx, etc.) to enhance the story telling. Otherwise, why comics?


  • SVS OG

    @Braden-Hallett Hi Braden! Your work is amazing and I believe it will fit both graphic novels and trade books. However, in graphic novels, you are going to make a lot of images. Your style needs to be something you can churn out fast and efficiently. If the line-less backgrounds are something you can produce quickly, then go with it. I wish you all the best!



  • @ArtofAleksey said in Critique my style (periodic checkin):

    Otherwise, why comics?

    Is very true!



  • @Nyrryl-Cadiz said in Critique my style (periodic checkin):

    However, in graphic novels, you are going to make a lot of images. Your style needs to be something you can churn out fast and efficiently. If the line-less backgrounds are something you can produce quickly, then go with it. I wish you all the best!

    Very true! I'd be interested to hear from people how long one should spend on a graphic novel page. I find those lineless background incredibly cheap and easy (for the moment) to do so I can get out 1-1.5 pages a day (if nose is to grindstone).


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