*Question* March 3rd Thurs Toxic Waste



  • @NoWayMe Thank you!



  • BrittanyHarris.jpg

    DONE! I think, notice anything off?



  • @bharris nailed the lighting, great job!



  • Definitely unique idea! I love the characters. I know that my son, when he was young, would probably have loved to become a toxic waste super hero :-)



  • This is really fantastic. Well done!



  • Oh I love it, so clever! The expressions are great and I love the layout and concept! Really well done!!!



  • @Chip-Valecek Thank you! It finally came together.

    @Marsha-Kay-Ottum-Owen lol thanks! I came up with it in that state of almost sleep... Wasn't sure it was actually a good idea at the time though.

    @Carrie and @Charlie-Eve-Ryan Thank you!



  • This turned out so amazing! Great work @bharris. Their is so much story going on with each person that I keep circling around and around finding new gems. So good.



  • Such a great concept!
    There's so much interesting stuff going on in the image, but without making it look too cluttered. I really feel compelled to stay and look at all the stuff happening in there!



  • This is nuts!

    Ace



  • I really enjoyed Will's critique for 3rd Thursday, an his changes would make a large improvement!

    I'm curious though if this piece works as a vignette for my portfolio if I just change the girl's pink shirt? Or do you think I should make all the changes and improve the focal point? From my understanding he was pointing me more toward a spot which was the assignment, but I think it can work outside that.

    Let me know your thoughts! :D



  • @bharris I think it could work! ... but then again I had the exact same critique you had, so maybe I am not the best judge! ;)

    Jokes aside, I think your piece is really strong and while I am not sure I fully understand the concept of a vignette yet, I think it could work. And I was under the impression @will-terry thought that too.

    This habit of wanting to include to much stuff in our illustrations is really hard to get rid of!



  • @NoWayMe I know right!? It's like editing writing, sometimes you have to get rid of parts you're really attached to.

    I was selfishly glad that I wasn't the only one that had that issue for the spot assignment, but yours I though was a ton closer than mine! I really hope they put together a class for it since it is so important for a portfolio.

    I guess I'm feeling like I want to move on to the next thing, but still want to use this somehow and I want it to be strong. Thanks for the feedback!



  • I looked around, and found a definition for spot/vignette/boxed/full bleed illustrations. If @will-terry, @lee-white or @jake-parker reads this, could you tell us is this definition is right ?! Thanks!

    Boxed, Vignette, Spot and Full Bleed
    (This may sound somewhat obvious, but it's worth clarifying!)
    In classically constructed books, a "boxed" illustration has straight defined edges, possibly with a border or frame, and sits within the confines of the page, so there is a gap between the image and the trim (i.e. the edge of the page). The illustration might be cropped from a loose-edged original, or painted to a ruled edge. As the border encloses the scene these are particularly suited to images with a considered, balanced composition.

    Vignettes are illustrations with faded or loosely defined edges. The loose edges incorporate the white of the surrounding page to give the image space, lightness and draw the viewer into the scene.

    A spot illustration is a small free-floating motif, usually with no background. In picture books spots are particularly useful as visual addenda to the main narrative.

    Bleed refers to part of an illustration that runs off the page edges, 'full bleed' means an image that entirely fills the page and is cropped by the trim. Nowadays very many picture books are full bleed throughout, however it's particularly effective when suddenly brought into play for the most dramatic and panoramic images.